Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Phonological naming therapy in jargon aphasia: Positive but paradoxical effects
Autore:
Robson, J; Marshall, J; Pring, T; Chiat, S;
Indirizzi:
City Univ London, Dept Clin Commun Studies, London EC1V 0HB, England City Univ London London England EC1V 0HB udies, London EC1V 0HB, England
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY
fascicolo: 6, volume: 4, anno: 1998,
pagine: 675 - 686
SICI:
1355-6177(199811)4:6<675:PNTIJA>2.0.ZU;2-I
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
WORD MATCHING TASKS; RETRIEVAL; PATIENT; ANOMIA; REHABILITATION; FACILITATION; IMPAIRMENTS; DEFICITS; MODELS;
Keywords:
jargon aphasia; anemia; phonological therapy; self-cuing strategy;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
38
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Robson, J City,Univ London, Dept Clin Commun Studies, Northampton Sq, London EC1V 0HB City Univ London Northampton Sq London England EC1V 0HB C1V 0HB
Citazione:
J. Robson et al., "Phonological naming therapy in jargon aphasia: Positive but paradoxical effects", J INT NEURO, 4(6), 1998, pp. 675-686

Abstract

This article is a single-case investigation of phonological naming therapy. The individual involved had fluent jargon speech, with neologisms, verbalparaphasias, and paragrammatisms. The jargon was underpinned by a severe anemia. Content words were rarely accessed either in spontaneous speech or naming. Single word investigations highlighted some preserved skills. Auditory comprehension, at least for concrete words, was relatively intact and although nonwords could not be repeated, words could, and at a level which was far superior to naming. The patient also had some ability to respond to phonological cues. These results suggested that phonological representationswere preserved and that there were some intact semantic abilities. It seemed that the naming disorder was primarily due to an inability to access phonology from semantics. Therapy took a phonological approach. The patient was encouraged to reflect upon the syllabic structure and first phoneme of pictured targets. Subsequently, she was required to use this partial phonological knowledge as a self-cue. It was hypothesized that this therapy might equip the subject with a self-cuing naming strategy. Posttherapy investigations of naming demonstrated dramatic improvements, which generalized to untreated items. However, there was little evidence that these were due to a self cuing strategy. Performance on phonological judgment and discrimination assessments, which required conscious phonological reflection, was unchanged, and there were no signs that the patient was self-cuing during naming. Reasons for these paradoxical results are discussed.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 01/12/20 alle ore 07:41:23