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Titolo:
RESPONSE OF SPRING BARLEY AND WEED COMMUNITIES TO LIME, PHOSPHORUS AND TILLAGE
Autore:
LEGERE A; SIMARD RR; LAPIERRE C;
Indirizzi:
AGR & AGROALIMENTAIRE CANADA,CTR RECH SOLS & GRANDES CULTURES,2560 BOUL HOCHELAGA ST FOY G1V 2J3 PQ CANADA
Titolo Testata:
Canadian Journal of Plant Science
fascicolo: 3, volume: 74, anno: 1994,
pagine: 421 - 428
SICI:
0008-4220(1994)74:3<421:ROSBAW>2.0.ZU;2-0
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SANDY LOAM SOIL; SIMPLIFIED CULTIVATION; WILD OAT; NITROGEN; GROWTH; YIELD; POTASSIUM; EMERGENCE; COMPETITIVENESS; FERTILITY;
Keywords:
CONSERVATION TILLAGE; REDUCED TILLAGE; MINIMUM TILLAGE; LIME; PHOSPHORUS; WEEDS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
33
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
A. Legere et al., "RESPONSE OF SPRING BARLEY AND WEED COMMUNITIES TO LIME, PHOSPHORUS AND TILLAGE", Canadian Journal of Plant Science, 74(3), 1994, pp. 421-428

Abstract

Soils under permanent pasture in eastern Canada are often characterized by acidic conditions and low P availability. A 3-yr experiment was initiated in the spring of 1988 to evaluate the feasibility of using conservation tillage practices and fertilization to improve the fertility of old, poorly managed pastures taken into cereals. The effects of tillage, liming and P additions on weed communities and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) yields were measured on a Joseph sandy loam (Humic Gleysol). The tillage systems were 1) moldboard plowing in the fall,with disc harrowing in the spring; 2) chisel plowing in the fall, with disc harrowing in the spring; and 3) minimum spring surface tillage. Liming and P applications favoured growth and yields of barley. Weedscompeting with barley were unable to derive benefits from either liming or increased P availability, despite their potential capacity to respond positively to this nutrient. Increasing soil fertility was generally detrimental to weeds, but this effect decreased with a reduction in tillage intensity. Yield response to improved fertility also decreased as tillage intensity was reduced. Despite a fertility status comparable to that found in the moldboard-plow treatment, conditions in reduced-tillage systems were less conducive to the competitiveness of thecrop and, thus, favoured the development of weed infestations, particularly under minimum tillage. Optimum crop management that can maximize the competitiveness of the crop needs to be applied if benefits of fertilization in reduced-tillage systems are to be fully realized.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 04/12/20 alle ore 15:39:29