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Titolo:
OLFACTORY-BASED SOCIAL-LEARNING VARIES AS A FUNCTION OF PARITY IN FEMALE RATS
Autore:
FLEMING AS; KUCHERA C; LEE A; WINOCUR G;
Indirizzi:
UNIV TORONTO,ERINDALE COLL,DEPT PSYCHOL MISSISSAUGA L5L 1C6 ON CANADA BAYCREST HOSP,ROTMAN RES INST TORONTO ON CANADA
Titolo Testata:
Psychobiology
fascicolo: 1, volume: 22, anno: 1994,
pagine: 37 - 43
SICI:
0889-6313(1994)22:1<37:OSVAAF>2.0.ZU;2-#
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
OBSERVER DIET PREFERENCE; DEMONSTRATOR INFLUENCE; EXPERIENCE; HYPOTHESIS; HORMONES; BEHAVIOR; MEMORY; ODORS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
28
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
A.S. Fleming et al., "OLFACTORY-BASED SOCIAL-LEARNING VARIES AS A FUNCTION OF PARITY IN FEMALE RATS", Psychobiology, 22(1), 1994, pp. 37-43

Abstract

New mother rats, under the influence of parturitional hormones, are nurturant as soon as their pups are born. Maternal experiences acquiredunder the influence of these hormones are retained for a considerableperiod beyond parturition. This effect is more robust in the postpartum animal than in a nulliparous animal that has been induced to becomematernal nonhormonally through daily exposure to pups. The present experiments were designed to determine whether the parity difference in robustness of a maternal experience reflects a parity difference in the ease of acquiring any task, or whether the learning must be specificto pups and the maternal context. In the first experiment, primiparous and nulliparous female rats were compared in their performance on a socially conditioned food preference task. Each animal was exposed to a conspecific that had previously eaten a new food and was then testedfor amount consumed of the preexposed as opposed to nonpreexposed newfood. The animals were exposed to their conspecifics for 5, 15, or 30min and were tested 7 days later. Both parity groups and all three exposure groups exhibited a significant preference for the preexposed diet, but a higher proportion of the postpartum animals did so. In the second experiment, postpartum and nulliparous animals were compared in their ability to recognize juvenile animals to whom they had been preexposed. Exposures lasted 30 min and exposure test intervals were 1, 3,or 5 days. Again, although both groups recognized the juveniles, the postpartum group showed a stronger recognition effect (reflected in change in investigation scores from exposure to reexposure). Thus, although the effects found were small, both experiments indicate that parity influences the robustness of social learning in a direction favoringthe postpartum animal.

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Documento generato il 07/07/20 alle ore 12:35:53