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Titolo:
HUMAN BRAIN LANGUAGE AREAS IDENTIFIED BY FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING
Autore:
BINDER JR; FROST JA; HAMMEKE TA; COX RW; RAO SM; PRIETO T;
Indirizzi:
MED COLL WISCONSIN,DEPT NEUROL,9200 W WISCONSIN AVE MILWAUKEE WI 53226 MED COLL WISCONSIN,DEPT CELLULAR BIOL & ANAT MILWAUKEE WI 53226 MED COLL WISCONSIN,BIOPHYS RES INST MILWAUKEE WI 53226
Titolo Testata:
The Journal of neuroscience
fascicolo: 1, volume: 17, anno: 1997,
pagine: 353 - 362
SICI:
0270-6474(1997)17:1<353:HBLAIB>2.0.ZU;2-M
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY; TRANSCORTICAL SENSORY APHASIA; SHORT-TERM-MEMORY; SELECTIVE IMPAIRMENT; ELECTRICAL-STIMULATION; CONDUCTION APHASIA; WORD COMPREHENSION; AUDITORY-CORTEX; FRONTAL-CORTEX; CT-SCAN;
Keywords:
LANGUAGE; FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; BRAIN MAPPING; SEMANTIC; PHONOLOGICAL; AUDITORY CORTEX;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
109
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
J.R. Binder et al., "HUMAN BRAIN LANGUAGE AREAS IDENTIFIED BY FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING", The Journal of neuroscience, 17(1), 1997, pp. 353-362

Abstract

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) was used to identify candidate language processing areas in the intact human brain. Language was defined broadly to include both phonological and lexical-semantic functions and to exclude sensory, motor, and general executive functions. The language activation task required phonetic and semantic analysis of aurally presented words and was compared with a control task involving perceptual analysis of nonlinguistic sounds. Functional maps of the entire brain were obtained from 30 right-handed subjects. These maps were averaged in standard stereotaxic space to produce a robust ''average activation map'' that proved reliable in a split-half analysis. As predicted from classical models of language organization based on lesion data, cortical activation associated with language processing was strongly lateralized to the left cerebral hemisphere and involved anetwork of regions in the frontal, temporal, and parietal robes. Lessconsistent with classical models were (1) the existence of left hemisphere temporoparietal language areas outside the traditional ''Wernicke area,'' namely, in the middle temporal, inferior temporal, fusiform,and angular gyri; (2) extensive left prefrontal language areas outside the classical ''Broca area''; and (3) clear participation of these left frontal areas in a task emphasizing ''receptive'' language functions. Although partly in conflict with the classical model of language localization, these findings are generally compatible with reported lesion data and provide additional support for ongoing efforts to refine and extend the classical model.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 27/11/20 alle ore 04:24:09