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Titolo:
PHILOPATRY, SITE FIDELITY, DISPERSAL, AND SURVIVAL OF SPOTTED SANDPIPERS
Autore:
REED JM; ORING LW;
Indirizzi:
UNIV NEVADA,EVOLUT ECOL & CONSERVAT BIOL PROGRAM,ERS 1000 VALLEY RD RENO NV 89512
Titolo Testata:
The Auk
fascicolo: 3, volume: 110, anno: 1993,
pagine: 541 - 551
SICI:
0004-8038(1993)110:3<541:PSFDAS>2.0.ZU;2-0
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NATAL PHILOPATRY; SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER; ACTITIS-MACULARIA; SEXUAL SELECTION; MATING SYSTEMS; PIPING PLOVERS; POPULATION; MATE; TENACITY; BIRDS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
60
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
J.M. Reed e L.W. Oring, "PHILOPATRY, SITE FIDELITY, DISPERSAL, AND SURVIVAL OF SPOTTED SANDPIPERS", The Auk, 110(3), 1993, pp. 541-551

Abstract

We assessed philopatry, site fidelity, dispersal, and survival duringthe last eight years of an 18-year study of Spotted Sandpipers (Actitis macularia). The first 10 years of the study were of an island population. For the last eight years of the study, we expanded the study area to include a mainland subpopulation, 7 km from the primary island population. We also assessed between-site movement. Yearlings made up 7to 36% of breeders recruited annually, and yearling return was negatively associated with number of fledglings the previous year. We found male-biased philopatry when all yearling returns were included, but nosignificant sex bias of birds that returned and bred. Return rate formales that successfully bred was 63%; for males that were not successful, 29% returned. For females, the return rate of successful breederswas 63% and for unsuccessful breeders 26%. Females changed territories between-clutches more often after nest failure, and birds moved moreoften to the island than to the mainland. We used hatch and fledging success, philopatry, and site fidelity rates to construct male and female life tables, separating successful and unsuccessful breeders. FromU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recovery records, dispersal distances ranged from 3.6 to 147 km. We conclude that expanding our study site gave a more accurate picture of philopatry, dispersal, and site fidelity. Birds apparently treated all study areas as a single site, with theisland preferred to the mainland for breeding.

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Documento generato il 02/12/20 alle ore 05:39:46