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Titolo:
MATE ACQUISITION TACTICS IN POLYANDROUS SPOTTED SANDPIPERS (ACTITIS-MACULARIA) - THE ROLE OF AGE AND EXPERIENCE
Autore:
ORING LW; REED JM; ALBERICO JAR;
Indirizzi:
UNIV NEVADA,PROGRAM ECOL EVOLUT & CONSERVAT BIOL,RWF,1000 VALLEY RD RENO NV 89512
Titolo Testata:
Behavioral ecology
fascicolo: 1, volume: 5, anno: 1994,
pagine: 9 - 16
SICI:
1045-2249(1994)5:1<9:MATIPS>2.0.ZU;2-2
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Keywords:
ACTITIS-MACULARIA; EXPERIENCE; MATE ACQUISITION; MATING SYSTEM; MATING TACTIC; MOVEMENT; POLYANDRY; RESOURCE DEFENSE; SHOREBIRD; SPOTTED SANDPIPER;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
NO
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
L.W. Oring et al., "MATE ACQUISITION TACTICS IN POLYANDROUS SPOTTED SANDPIPERS (ACTITIS-MACULARIA) - THE ROLE OF AGE AND EXPERIENCE", Behavioral ecology, 5(1), 1994, pp. 9-16

Abstract

We consider resource-defense polyandry and mate-access polyandry as female mating tactics in spotted sandpipers (Actitis macularia). These tactics can be distinguished by the resource females defend, female interclutch movement, expected reproductive success after moving, and male and female dispersion. We examine these characteristics relatiVe LOpatterns observed in a 17-year study of spotted sandpipers, a speciestraditionally considered resource-defense polyandrous. On average, 26% of spotted sandpiper females each year were monogamous. Older females were more likely to be polyandrous, and polyandrous females of each age employed different mating tactics. Yearlings were typically sequentially resource-defense polyandrous. Two-year-olds were primarily simultaneously polyandrous, exhibiting equivalent proportions of resource-defense and mate-access polyandry. Older females were primarily simultaneously resource-defense polyandrous. Females tended to stay on territories where they and/or their mates had greater breeding experience (i.e., many clutches laid for females, many clutches that hatched for males); females that moved went to territories where their mates had a history of breeding success. Location changes between clutches by polyandrous females were better described by breeding experience on a territory than by age.

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Documento generato il 02/12/20 alle ore 05:22:45