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Titolo:
PHYSICIANS PREDICTIONS OF ELDERLY OUTPATIENTS PREFERENCE FOR LIFE-SUSTAINING TREATMENT
Autore:
DRULEY JA; DITTO PH; MOORE KA; DANKS JH; TOWNSEND A; SMUCKER WD;
Indirizzi:
KENT STATE UNIV,DEPT PSYCHOL KENT OH 44242 KENT STATE UNIV,DEPT PSYCHOL KENT OH 44242 FAMILY PRACTICE CTR AKRON OH 00000
Titolo Testata:
Journal of family practice
fascicolo: 5, volume: 37, anno: 1993,
pagine: 469 - 475
SICI:
0094-3509(1993)37:5<469:PPOEOP>2.0.ZU;2-S
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PATIENTS RESUSCITATION PREFERENCES; CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION; ADVANCE DIRECTIVES; DECISIONS; CARE; ATTITUDES; ORDERS;
Keywords:
JUDGMENT; LIFE-SUPPORT CARE; AGED; ADVANCE DIRECTIVES; PHYSICIAN-PATIENT RELATIONS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
23
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
J.A. Druley et al., "PHYSICIANS PREDICTIONS OF ELDERLY OUTPATIENTS PREFERENCE FOR LIFE-SUSTAINING TREATMENT", Journal of family practice, 37(5), 1993, pp. 469-475

Abstract

Background. Research has shown that physicians are poor predictors ofpatients' fife-sustaining treatment preferences. Our study examined the association between three aspects of physician experience and theirability to accurately predict patients' preferences for two differentlife-sustaining treatments in the event of two serious medical conditions. Methods. Seventeen physicians predicted the treatment preferences of 57 patients and then interviewed patients regarding their actual treatment preferences. Physicians' professional experience, length of their relationship with the patient, and experience with direct feedback were measured to determine the association of these factors with the accuracy of the physicians' predictions. Results. Physicians became more accurate predictors as they interviewed more patients and received direct feedback regarding the accuracy of their predictions (P < .001). Residents were more accurate than faculty in predicting patients' preferences (P < .05). Conclusions. Increased experience with life-sustaining treatment discussions improved the physicians' abilities to accurately predict patient preferences. Although possibly resulting fromsmall sample size, neither greater professional experience nor longerrelationship with a patient improved the accuracy of physicians' predictions. Future research should examine whether discussing end-of-lifeissues with patients more often makes physicians more sensitive predictors of patients' life-sustaining treatment preferences.

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Documento generato il 27/09/20 alle ore 22:42:37