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Titolo:
THE NEURAL BASIS OF DRUG CRAVING - AN INCENTIVE-SENSITIZATION THEORY OF ADDICTION
Autore:
ROBINSON TE; BERRIDGE KC;
Indirizzi:
UNIV MICHIGAN,DEPT PSYCHOL,1103 E HURON ST ANN ARBOR MI 48104 UNIV MICHIGAN,NEUROSCI PROGRAM ANN ARBOR MI 48104
Titolo Testata:
Brain research reviews
fascicolo: 3, volume: 18, anno: 1993,
pagine: 247 - 291
SICI:
0165-0173(1993)18:3<247:TNBODC>2.0.ZU;2-1
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA; INDUCED BEHAVIORAL SENSITIZATION; STRIATAL DOPAMINE RELEASE; OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER; CONDITIONED PLACE-PREFERENCE; REWARD-RELATED STIMULI; RAT NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS; FREELY MOVING RATS; REPEATED AMPHETAMINE PRETREATMENT; INVIVO INTRACEREBRAL DIALYSIS;
Keywords:
DRUG ADDICTION; BRAIN; DOPAMINE; INCENTIVE MOTIVATION; SENSITIZATION; NEUROADAPTATION; NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS; STRIATUM;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
376
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
T.E. Robinson e K.C. Berridge, "THE NEURAL BASIS OF DRUG CRAVING - AN INCENTIVE-SENSITIZATION THEORY OF ADDICTION", Brain research reviews, 18(3), 1993, pp. 247-291

Abstract

This paper presents a biopsychological theory of drug addiction, the 'Incentive-Sensitization Theory'. The theory addresses three fundamental questions. The first is: why do addicts crave drugs? That is, what is the psychological and neurobiological basis of drug craving? The second is: why does drug craving persist even after long periods of abstinence? The third is whether 'wanting' drugs (drug craving) is attributable to 'liking' drugs (to the subjective pleasurable effects of drugs)? The theory posits the following. (1) Addictive drugs share the ability to enhance mesotelencephalic dopamine neurotransmission. (2) One psychological function of this neural system is to attribute 'incentive salience' to the perception and mental representation of events associated with activation of the system. Incentive salience is a psychological process that transforms the perception of stimuli, imbuing them with salience, making them attractive, 'wanted', incentive stimuli. (3) In some individuals the repeated use of addictive drugs produces incremental neuroadaptations in this neural system, rendering it increasingly and perhaps permanently, hypersensitive ('sensitized') to drugs and drug-associated stimuli. The sensitization of dopamine systems is gated by associative learning, which causes excessive incentive salience to be attributed to the act of drug taking and to stimuli associatedwith drug taking. It is specifically the sensitization of incentive salience, therefore, that transforms ordinary 'wanting' into excessive drug craving. (4) It is further proposed that sensitization of the neural systems responsible for incentive salience (for 'wanting') can occur independently of changes in neural systems that mediate the subjective pleasurable effects of drugs (drug 'liking') and of neural systemsthat mediate withdrawal. Thus, sensitization of incentive salience can produce addictive behavior (compulsive drug seeking and drug taking)even if the expectation of drug pleasure or the aversive properties of withdrawal are diminished and even in the face of strong disincentives, including the loss of reputation, job, home and family. We review evidence for this view of addiction and discuss its implications for understanding the psychology and neurobiology of addiction.

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Documento generato il 28/01/21 alle ore 01:33:33