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Titolo:
UPPER AIRWAY-OBSTRUCTION DURING MIDAZOLAM SEDATION - MODIFICATION BY NASAL CPAP
Autore:
NOZAKITAGUCHI N; ISONO S; NISHINO T; NUMAI T; TAGUCHI N;
Indirizzi:
CHIBA UNIV,SCH MED,DEPT ANAESTHESIOL,CHUO KU,1-8-1 INOHANA CHIBA 270 JAPAN FUNABASHI MUNICIPAL MED CTR,DEPT ANAESTHESIA FUNABASHI CHIBA JAPAN
Titolo Testata:
Canadian journal of anaesthesia
fascicolo: 8, volume: 42, anno: 1995,
pagine: 685 - 690
SICI:
0832-610X(1995)42:8<685:UADMS->2.0.ZU;2-3
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SPINAL-ANESTHESIA; OXYGEN DESATURATION; SLEEP;
Keywords:
AIRWAY, OBSTRUCTION; ANESTHETIC TECHNIQUES, SPINAL; HYPNOTICS, BENZODIAZEPINES; VENTILATON, OBSTRUCTION, OXYGENATION, CONTINUOUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
16
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
N. Nozakitaguchi et al., "UPPER AIRWAY-OBSTRUCTION DURING MIDAZOLAM SEDATION - MODIFICATION BY NASAL CPAP", Canadian journal of anaesthesia, 42(8), 1995, pp. 685-690

Abstract

We examined the depressant effect of midazolam on respiration in 21 healthy women undergoing lower abdominal surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Airway gas flow, airway pressure, and the sound of snoring were recorded together with arterial oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) After spinal anaesthesia was established, subjects were deeply sedated with pentazocine 15 mg followed by incremental doses of midazolam 1 mg iv up to 0.1mg . kg(-1). When SpO(2) decreased to <90% or snoring and/or apnoea was observed, continuous positive airway pressure applied through the nose (nasal CPAP) was increased until the respiratory deterioration warreversed. While one patient remained free of respiratory events, the other 20 patients were successfully treated with nasal CPAP restoring normal SpO(2) (95.5 +/- 1.7%) without snoring. Stepwise reduction of nasal CPAP determined the minimally effective CPAP to prevent snoring to be 5.1 +/- 2.1 cm H2O. Further reduction of nasal CPAP induced snoring in 15 patients and obstructive apnoea in five patients with the latter accompanied by a severe reduction of SpO(2) (824 +/- 6.1%). Patients with apnoea were older than those who snored (P < 0.05). We conclude that upper airway obstruction contributes considerably to decreases in SpO(2) during midazolam sedation for spinal anaesthesia.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 24/09/20 alle ore 11:17:53