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Titolo:
COMPARISON OF THE RESPONSES TO MOVING TEXTURE PATTERNS OF SIMPLE AND COMPLEX CELLS IN THE CATS AREA-17
Autore:
CASANOVA C; SAVARD T; NORDMANN JP; MOLOTCHNIKOFF S; MINVILLE K;
Indirizzi:
UNIV SHERBROOKE,FAC MED,DEPT SURG OPHTHALMOL SHERBROOKE PQ J1H 5N4 CANADA UNIV SHERBROOKE,FAC MED,DEPT PHYSIOL SHERBROOKE PQ J1H 5N4 CANADA UNIV SHERBROOKE,FAC MED,DEPT BIOPHYS SHERBROOKE PQ J1H 5N4 CANADA
Titolo Testata:
Journal of neurophysiology
fascicolo: 3, volume: 74, anno: 1995,
pagine: 1271 - 1286
SICI:
0022-3077(1995)74:3<1271:COTRTM>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
RANDOM-DOT PATTERNS; FELINE VISUAL-CORTEX; STRIATE CORTEX; STIMULUS-SPECIFICITY; GRATING STIMULI; BAR; MOTION; NOISE; SELECTIVITY; NEURONS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
40
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
C. Casanova et al., "COMPARISON OF THE RESPONSES TO MOVING TEXTURE PATTERNS OF SIMPLE AND COMPLEX CELLS IN THE CATS AREA-17", Journal of neurophysiology, 74(3), 1995, pp. 1271-1286

Abstract

1. Whether complex (C) cells are the only truly texture-sensitive units in the cat's primary visual cortex remains controversial. in view of the strong physiological significance of having putatively only one class of cells sensitive to visual noise in the striate cortex, we reinvestigated this issue. Sensitivities of simple(S) and C cells to noise were quantitatively studied and compared in order to clearly document the response properties of cells in the striate cortex to visual noise and to establish whether one can unequivocally segregate S from C cells on the basis of those specific properties. 2. Receptive fields were stimulated with all relevant stimuli, i.e., drifting sine-wave gratings, electronically generated noise pattern of 256 x 256 elements (ratio 1:1 of dark and light elements), and flashing and moving bars (both bright and dark). 3. A total of 60 S cells out of 85 (70.6%) and 90 C cells out of 101 (81.8%) responded to the motion of visual noise. Responses of most C cells were sustained, i.e., their discharge rate wasmaintained at a constant level throughout presentation of the stimulus. On the other hand, responses of the majority of S cells were characterized by several bursts of discharges. On average, optimal firing rates were greater for gratings than for noise. 4. For practically all cells, responses to noise varied as a function of direction of motion. The mean direction bandwidths were, respectively, 43 +/- 24 degrees and 48 +/- 23 degrees (mean +/- SD) for S and C cells. In both groups, neurons were more broadly tuned for the direction of noise than that ofgratings (t-test, P < 0.001). We rarely observed bimodal tuning curves for noise, with each peak lying on either side of the orientation curve. These results could be expected if one considers texture stimuli not in the space domain (as dot patterns) but in the frequency domain,i.e., patterns containing all spatial frequencies and orientations. 5. In general, the direction indexes of S and C cells were similar whether they were stimulated by drifting noise or gratings. S cells had a slight tendency to be more direction selective for noise than for gratings. 6. For all S and C cells tested, responses to noise varied as a function of drift velocity. The mean optimal velocity was 12.9 and 10.2 degrees/s for S and C cells, respectively (t-test, P > 0.05). Most cells were band-pass with mean bandwidths of 2.2 and 2.7 octaves for S and C cells, respectively. Enlarging the size of pattern elements yielded an increase in response amplitude and bandwidth in both cell groups. 7. Texture-sensitive units were distributed in all layers. Strong texture-sensitive C cells were generally located in the infragranular layers. There was no clear relationship between laminar distribution and noise responsiveness for S cells. 8. Our study shows that, except for response profile and strength, there were no significant differencesbetween response properties of S and C cells with respect to their noise sensitivity. These data suggest that visual noise does not allow one to clearly segregate S from C cells. Also, they do not support the notion that C cells receive inputs not mediated by S cells.

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Documento generato il 31/10/20 alle ore 03:11:11