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Titolo:
HEAVY DRINKING IN A POPULATION OF METHADONE-MAINTAINED CLIENTS
Autore:
CHATHAM LR; ROWANSZAL GA; JOE GW; BROWN BS; SIMPSON DD;
Indirizzi:
TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIV,INST BEHAV RES,POB 32880 FT WORTH TX 76129
Titolo Testata:
Journal of studies on alcohol
fascicolo: 4, volume: 56, anno: 1995,
pagine: 417 - 422
SICI:
0096-882X(1995)56:4<417:HDIAPO>2.0.ZU;2-8
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MAINTENANCE TREATMENT PROGRAM; ALCOHOL-USE; HEROIN-ADDICTS; FOLLOW-UP; NARCOTIC ADDICTS; ABUSE; DEPENDENCE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
33
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
L.R. Chatham et al., "HEAVY DRINKING IN A POPULATION OF METHADONE-MAINTAINED CLIENTS", Journal of studies on alcohol, 56(4), 1995, pp. 417-422

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between heavy use of alcohol and response to methadone treatment. Method: A sample of clients showing three or more DSM-III-R symptoms (n = 79) were identified and compared with a sample of heavy-drinking clients (n = 108) with less than three alcohol dependency symptoms on admitting characteristics and on tenure in treatment. Results: As expected,clients meeting DSM-III-R dependency criteria were significantly morelikely to show evidence of psychological problems and dysfunction of family and peer relations at admission. An unexpected finding was thatthey were also more likely to remain in treatment longer than drinking clients who did not report dependency. Alcohol dependent clients were significantly more likely to have prior experience with self-help groups, which may reflect less denial and therefore relatively better ability to focus on opiate dependency problems. Conclusions: Failure to differentiate between alcohol dependent and nondependent groups of drinkers enrolled in methadone treatment may help account for reported differences in treatment outcome studies. Recognizing these different types of drinkers also may help clinicians plan more effective treatments.

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Documento generato il 19/09/20 alle ore 09:33:12