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Titolo:
RUNOFF PRODUCTION IN A FORESTED, SHALLOW SOIL, CANADIAN SHIELD BASIN
Autore:
PETERS DL; BUTTLE JM; TAYLOR CH; LAZERTE BD;
Indirizzi:
TRENT UNIV,WATERSHED ECOSYST GRAD PROGRAM PETERBOROUGH ON K9J 7B8 CANADA TRENT UNIV,DEPT GEOG PETERBOROUGH ON K9J 7B8 CANADA ONTARIO MINIST ENVIRONM & ENERGY,DORSET RES CTR DORSET ON P0A 1E0 CANADA
Titolo Testata:
Water resources research
fascicolo: 5, volume: 31, anno: 1995,
pagine: 1291 - 1304
SICI:
0043-1397(1995)31:5<1291:RPIAFS>2.0.ZU;2-V
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
STREAMFLOW GENERATION; HYDROGRAPH SEPARATION; PRECAMBRIAN SHIELD; CAPILLARY-FRINGE; STORM RUNOFF; WATER; GROUNDWATER; TRANSPORT; CATCHMENTS; DISCHARGE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
47
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
D.L. Peters et al., "RUNOFF PRODUCTION IN A FORESTED, SHALLOW SOIL, CANADIAN SHIELD BASIN", Water resources research, 31(5), 1995, pp. 1291-1304

Abstract

Storm flow in forested basins on the Canadian Shield is largely supplied by subsurface water; however, mechanisms by which this water reaches the stream remain unclear. Side slope contributions to storm flow were studied using throughflow trenches on slopes in a headwater basin near Dorset, Ontario. Discharge, soil water content, and chemical and isotopic signatures of subsurface water were monitored at each site. Four hypotheses were tested: (1) most flow occurs at the soil-bedrock interface on shield slopes with thin soil; (2) a significant fraction of event water moves vertically to bedrock via preferential flow pathways and laterally over the bedrock surface; (3) relative preevent watercontribution to subsurface flow on shield slopes is a function of soil thickness; and (4) a significant portion of event water flux in storm flow from forested basins with shallow soil cover is supplied from side slopes via subsurface flow along the soil-bedrock interface. Hypothesis 1 was confirmed from hydrometric observations during spring and fall rainstorms. Hypotheses 2 and 3 were supported by temporal trends in dissolved organic carbon and O-18 in flow at the soil-bedrock interface and by isotopic hydrograph separations (IHSs) of hillslope runoff. Comparison with the streamflow IHS indicated that event water flux from the basin in excess of that attributable to direct precipitation onto near-channel saturated areas could be supplied by flow along the bedrock surface (hypothesis 4). Flow at the soil-bedrock interface on side slopes also contributed similar to 25% of preevent water flux fromthe basin. Much of the event water component of basin storm flow may travel considerable distances via subsurface routes and is not necessarily contributed by surface runoff processes (Horton flow or saturation overland flow). Therefore the assumption that event water undergoes little interaction with the soil during its passage downslope may be unwarranted here.

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Documento generato il 02/12/20 alle ore 05:09:12