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Titolo:
THE CONVERSION OF SO2 TO SULFATE IN THE ATMOSPHERE
Autore:
EATOUGH DJ; CAKA FM; FARBER RJ;
Indirizzi:
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV,DEPT CHEM PROVO UT 84602 SO CALIF EDISON CO ROSEMEAD CA 91770
Titolo Testata:
Israel Journal of Chemistry
fascicolo: 3-4, volume: 34, anno: 1994,
pagine: 301 - 314
SICI:
0021-2148(1994)34:3-4<301:TCOSTS>2.0.ZU;2-A
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ACID DEPOSITION MODEL; PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANT MODEL; TO-PARTICLE CONVERSION; CENTRAL UNITED-STATES; POWER-PLANT PLUMES; IN-CLOUD OXIDATION; RAY PRODUCED S-38; HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE; SULFUR-DIOXIDE; GAS-PHASE;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
171
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
D.J. Eatough et al., "THE CONVERSION OF SO2 TO SULFATE IN THE ATMOSPHERE", Israel Journal of Chemistry, 34(3-4), 1994, pp. 301-314

Abstract

The atmospheric chemistry responsible for the conversion of SO2(g) toparticulate sulfate in areas impacted by anthropogenic emission of SO2 is reviewed. The major reaction mechanism for the homogeneous conversion process in the absence of clouds or fog is the oxidation of SO2(g) by the hydroxyl radical. The rate of this conversion process increases with both increasing temperature and relative humidity. Correlations are described for the effects of these two variables on the conversion process, and equations given which correlate all of the available literature data for the homogeneous conversion process in ambient atmospheres. The ;conversion of S(IV) to sulfate via aqueous solution chemistry in clouds and fog is more complex and dependent on several variables, including concentrations of the principal oxidants (hydrogen peroxide and ozone), ammonia, droplet size and composition, and meteorology. The gas-phase homogeneous conversion process can vary from less than 1% SO2(g) converted per hour to a maximum of about 10% converted perhour at high temperature and relative humidity. In contrast, the rateof conversion of S(IV) to sulfate in the aqueous-phase homogeneous process is controlled by mixing and reactant limitations, rather than kinetic considerations. The process can involve 100% SO2 converted per hour under optimum conditions. Consequences of the various conversion processes on environmental quality are briefly illustrated with a discussion of the impact of sulfate-containing aerosols on PM(10) concentrations and visibility degradation.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 02/07/20 alle ore 18:53:00