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Titolo:
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UPPER RESPIRATORY-INFECTIONS AND HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS FOR ASTHMA - A TIME-TREND ANALYSIS
Autore:
JOHNSTON SL; PATTEMORE PK; SANDERSON G; SMITH S; CAMPBELL MJ; JOSEPHS LK; CUNNINGHAM A; ROBINSON BS; MYINT SH; WARD ME; TYRRELL DAJ; HOLGATE ST;
Indirizzi:
UNIV SOUTHAMPTON,SOUTHAMPTON GEN HOSP,LEVEL D,CTR BLOCK,TREMONA RD SOUTHAMPTON SO16 6YD HANTS ENGLAND UNIV SOUTHAMPTON,DEPT MED STAT & COMP SOUTHAMPTON HANTS ENGLAND UNIV SOUTHAMPTON,DEPT MOL MICROBIOL SOUTHAMPTON HANTS ENGLAND UNIV LEICESTER,DEPT MICROBIOL LEICESTER LEICS ENGLAND MRC,COMMON COLD UNIT SALISBURY WILTS ENGLAND
Titolo Testata:
American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
fascicolo: 3, volume: 154, anno: 1996,
pagine: 654 - 660
SICI:
1073-449X(1996)154:3<654:TRBURA>2.0.ZU;2-#
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ACUTE CHILDHOOD ASTHMA; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY; HUMAN RHINOVIRUSES; CONTROLLED TRIAL; CHILDREN; VIRUSES; EXACERBATIONS; SYMPTOMS; RECEPTOR; PRECIPITANTS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
37
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
S.L. Johnston et al., "THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UPPER RESPIRATORY-INFECTIONS AND HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS FOR ASTHMA - A TIME-TREND ANALYSIS", American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 154(3), 1996, pp. 654-660

Abstract

We have shown that viruses are associated with 80 to 85% of asthma exacerbations in school-age children in the community. We hypothesize that viral infections are also associated with severe attacks of asthma precipitating hospital admissions. To investigate this, we conducted atime-trend analysis, comparing the seasonal patterns of respiratory infections and hospital admissions for asthma in adults and children. During a 1-yr study in the Southampton area of the United Kingdom, 108 school-age children monitored upper and lower respiratory symptoms andtook peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) recordings. from children reporting a symptomatic episode or a decrease in PEFR, samples were taken for detection of viruses and atypical bacteria. A total of 232 respiratory viruses and four atypical bacteria were detected. The half-monthlyrates of upper respiratory infection were compared with the half-monthly rates for hospital admissions for asthma (International Classification of Diseases [ICD] code 493) for the same time period for the hospitals serving the areas from which the cohort of schoolchildren was drawn. The relationships of upper respiratory infections and hospital admissions for asthma with school attendance were studied. Strong correlations were found between the seasonal patterns of upper respiratory infections and hospital admissions for asthma (r = 0.72; p < 0.0001). This relationship was stronger for pediatric (r = 0.68; p < 0.0001) than for adult admissions (r = 0.53; p < 0.01). Upper respiratory infections and admissions for asthma were more frequent during periods of school attendance (87% of pediatric and 84% of total admissions), than during school holiday periods (p < 0.001). These relationships remained significant when allowance was made for linear trend and seasonal variation using multiple regression analysis (p < 0.01). Not surprisingly,school attendance, because it is a major factor in respiratory virus transmission, was found to be a major confounding variable in children. This study demonstrates that upper respiratory viral infections are strongly associated in time with hospital admissions for asthma in children and adults. Rhinoviruses were the major pathogen implicated, andthe majority of viral infections and asthma admissions occurred during school attendance.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 20/09/20 alle ore 07:34:25