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Titolo:
SECONDARY TASK EFFECTS ON SEQUENCE LEARNING
Autore:
HEUER H; SCHMIDTKE V;
Indirizzi:
UNIV DORTMUND,INST ARBEITSPHYSIOL,ARDEYSTR 67 D-44139 DORTMUND GERMANY
Titolo Testata:
Psychological research
fascicolo: 2, volume: 59, anno: 1996,
pagine: 119 - 133
SICI:
0340-0727(1996)59:2<119:STEOSL>2.0.ZU;2-G
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MOVEMENT SEQUENCES; INTERACTIVE TASKS; IMPLICIT; KNOWLEDGE; ATTENTION;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
Citazioni:
37
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
H. Heuer e V. Schmidtke, "SECONDARY TASK EFFECTS ON SEQUENCE LEARNING", Psychological research, 59(2), 1996, pp. 119-133

Abstract

With a repeated sequence of stimuli, performance in a serial reaction-time task improves more than with a random sequence. The difference has been taken as a measure of implicit sequence learning. Implicit sequence learning is impaired when a secondary task is added to the serial RT task. In the first experiment, secondary-task effects on different types of sequences were studied to test the hypothesis that the learning of unique sequences (where each sequence element has a unique relation to the following one) is not impaired by the secondary task, while the learning of ambiguous sequences is. The sequences were random up to a certain order of sequential dependencies, where they became deterministic. Contrary to the hypothesis, secondary-task effects on the learning of unique sequences were as strong or stronger than such effects on the learning of ambiguous sequences. In the second experiment ahybrid sequence (with unique as well as ambiguous transitions) was used with different secondary tasks. A visuo-spatial and a verbal memorytask did not interfere with the learning of the sequence, but interference was observed with an auditory go/no-go task in which high- and low-pitched tones were presented after each manual response and a foot pedal had to be pressed in response to high-pitched tones. Thus, interference seems to be specific to certain secondary tasks and may be related to memory processes (but most likely not to visuo-spatial and verbal memory) or to the organization of sequences, consistent with previous suggestions.

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Documento generato il 21/09/20 alle ore 06:10:25