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Titolo:
PREVALENCE AND IDENTIFICATION OF ABNORMAL LIPOPROTEIN LEVELS IN A BIRACIAL POPULATION AGED 23 TO 35 YEARS (THE CARDIA STUDY)
Autore:
GIDDING SS; LIU K; BILD DE; FLACK J; GARDIN J; RUTH KJ; OBERMAN A;
Indirizzi:
2300 CHILDRENS PLAZA,MAIL CODE 21 CHICAGO IL 60614
Titolo Testata:
The American journal of cardiology
fascicolo: 3, volume: 78, anno: 1996,
pagine: 304 - 308
SICI:
0002-9149(1996)78:3<304:PAIOAL>2.0.ZU;2-V
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE; BLOOD CHOLESTEROL; SERUM-CHOLESTEROL; UNITED-STATES; YOUNG-ADULTS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
11
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
S.S. Gidding et al., "PREVALENCE AND IDENTIFICATION OF ABNORMAL LIPOPROTEIN LEVELS IN A BIRACIAL POPULATION AGED 23 TO 35 YEARS (THE CARDIA STUDY)", The American journal of cardiology, 78(3), 1996, pp. 304-308

Abstract

This study examines the prevalence of abnormal low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels in youngadults to determine the ability of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) guidelines to identify persons with elevated LDL cholesterol, to compare other algorithms with those of theATP, and to determine the contributions of race, gender, and other coronary artery disease risk factors to identifying patients with elevated LDL and low HDL cholesterol. The cohort was population-based, aged 23 to 35 years, and included relatively equal numbers of blacks and whites, and men and women. The prevalence of LDL cholesterol greater than or equal to 160 mg/dl (>4.1 mmol/L) was 5% in black women, 4% in white women, 10% in black men, and 9% in white men. ATP identified most participants with elevated LDL cholesterol (range: 58.8% of white men to 70.7% of block women). Lipoprotein panels would have been required in 6% to 7% of women and to 15% to 18% of men. Algorithms that used nonlipid risk factors required more lipoprotein panels and identified fewer additional participants at risk. The prevalence of HDL cholesterol <35 mg/dl (0.9 mmol/L) was 3% in women, 7% in block men, and 13% in white men. Algorithms that used nonlipid risk factors before measuring HDL cholesterol would require HDL cholesterol measurements in 35% of whites and 56% of blacks, but reduced sensitivity for identifying low HDL cholesterol (range: 58% in white men to 93% in black women). In young adults, algorithms based on nonlipid risk factors and family historyhave lower sensitivity, and increase rather than decrease the number of fasting lipoprotein panels required when compared with ATP levels.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 24/11/20 alle ore 14:43:40