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Titolo:
IMPORTANCE OF LOCALIZED SKIN INFECTION IN TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS-VIRUS TRANSMISSION
Autore:
LABUDA M; AUSTYN JM; ZUFFOVA E; KOZUCH O; FUCHSBERGER N; LYSY J; NUTTALL PA;
Indirizzi:
NERC,INST VIROL & ENVIRONM MICROBIOL,MANSFIELD RD OXFORD OX1 3SR ENGLAND NERC,INST VIROL & ENVIRONM MICROBIOL OXFORD OX1 3SR ENGLAND SLOVAK ACAD SCI,INST VIROL BRATISLAVA 84246 SLOVAKIA SLOVAK ACAD SCI,INST ZOOL BRATISLAVA 84246 SLOVAKIA UNIV OXFORD,JOHN RADCLIFFE HOSP,NUFFIELD DEPT SURG OXFORD OX3 9DU ENGLAND
Titolo Testata:
Virology
fascicolo: 2, volume: 219, anno: 1996,
pagine: 357 - 366
SICI:
0042-6822(1996)219:2<357:IOLSII>2.0.ZU;2-W
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
LANGERHANS CELLS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
20
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
M. Labuda et al., "IMPORTANCE OF LOCALIZED SKIN INFECTION IN TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS-VIRUS TRANSMISSION", Virology, 219(2), 1996, pp. 357-366

Abstract

Arboviruses are transmitted to vertebrates by the ''bite'' of infected arthropods. Events at the site of virus deposition are largely unknown despite increasing evidence that blood-sucking arthropods immunomodulate their skin site of feeding. This question is particularly relevant for ixodid ticks that feed for several days. To examine events under conditions mimicking tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus transmission in nature (i.e., infected and uninfected lxodes ricinus ticks feeding on the same animal), infected adult and uninfected nymphal ticks were placed in one retaining chamber (skin site A) and uninfected nymphs were placed within a second chamber posteriorly (skin site B) on two natural host species, yellow-necked field mice (Apodemus flavicollis) and bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus). Virus transmission from infected to uninfected cofeeding ticks was correlated with infection in theskin site of lick feeding. Furthermore virus was recruited preferentially to the site in which ticks were feeding compared with uninfested skin sites. Viremia did not correspond with a generalized infection ofthe skin; virus was not detected in an uninfested skin site (C) of 12/13 natural hosts that had viremia levels greater than or equal to 2.0log(10) ic mouse LD(50)/0.02 ml blood. To characterize infected cells, laboratory mouse strains were infested with infected licks and then explants were removed from selected skin sites and floated on culture medium. Numerous leukocytes were found to migrate from the skin explants of tick feeding sites. Two-color immunocytochemistry revealed viralantigen in both migratory Langerhans cells and neutrophils; in addition, the migratory monocyte/macrophages were shown to produce infectious virus. The results indicate that the local skin site of tick feedingis an important focus of viral replication early after TBE virus transmission by ticks. Cellular infiltration of tick feeding sites, and the migration of cells from such sites, may provide a vehicle for transmission between infected and uninfected cofeeding ticks that is independent of a patent viremia. The data support the hypothesis that viremiais a product, rather than a prerequisite, of tick-borne virus transmission. (C) 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 22/09/20 alle ore 11:06:51