Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
LONG-DISTANCE MOVEMENTS BY AMERICAN AVOCETS AND BLACK-NECKED STILTS
Autore:
ROBINSON JA; ORING LW;
Indirizzi:
UNIV HOUSTON,DEPT BIOL HOUSTON TX 77204 UNIV NEVADA,ECOL EVOLUT & CONSERVAT BIOL PROGRAM 186 RENO NV 89512 UNIV NEVADA,DEPT ENVIRONM & RESOURCE SCI RENO NV 89512
Titolo Testata:
Journal of field ornithology
fascicolo: 2, volume: 67, anno: 1996,
pagine: 307 - 320
SICI:
0273-8570(1996)67:2<307:LMBAAA>2.0.ZU;2-T
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
KESTERSON RESERVOIR; AQUATIC BIRDS; SELENIUM; CALIFORNIA; FAILURE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
31
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
J.A. Robinson e L.W. Oring, "LONG-DISTANCE MOVEMENTS BY AMERICAN AVOCETS AND BLACK-NECKED STILTS", Journal of field ornithology, 67(2), 1996, pp. 307-320

Abstract

Color-banded American Avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and Black-necked Stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) were resighted >50 km from their banding locations in the Great Basin. Records from 90 migration and winter resightings of birds banded in the Honey Lake Valley (northeastern California) and 3 birds banded at Great Salt Lake (Utah) provided unique data on long-distance movements by individuals of these species. Avocets and stilts left Honey Lake breeding areas and went to stopover areas at Mono Lake and in the Tulare Basin as early as July. Some individuals spent 48 days or more in the Tulare Basin. Both avocets and stilts were observed in sibling groups during migration. Although one pairof banded stilts was observed during migration, differences in sex ratio at a migration stopover site suggested that male and female stiltsmight have different wintering ranges or migration behavior. Avocets from Honey Lake were found wintering along the California coast from Arcata southward and along the west coast of Sinaloa, Mexico. First-year avocets were more often seen in coastal areas of California (relative to inland areas) than were adults. Stilts were found wintering in central California. Avocets and stilts banded in Utah were seen in the Tulare Basin (one stilt) and at wintering grounds in Mexico (one avocetand one stilt), indicating the potential for population mixing. We propose that avocets migrate in short hops, retain partial family group associations during migration, and may have age-specific differences in migratory behavior or wintering range. We propose that stilts retainpartial family group associations during migration, maintain pair bonds beyond the breeding attempt, and have sexual differences in migratory behavior or wintering range. These results have important ramifications for understanding impacts of drainwater evaporation ponds in the Tulare Basin on nonbreeding avocets and stilts.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 02/12/20 alle ore 05:13:39