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Titolo:
AUSTRALIAN DELIBERATIONS ON ACCESS TO ITS TERRESTRIAL AND MARINE BIODIVERSITY
Autore:
BAKER JT; BELL JD; MURPHY PT;
Indirizzi:
AUSTRALIAN INST MARINE SCI,PMB 3 TOWNSVILLE QLD 4810 AUSTRALIA DEPT IND SCI & TECHNOL CANBERRA ACT 2601 AUSTRALIA
Titolo Testata:
Journal of ethnopharmacology
fascicolo: 1-3, volume: 51, anno: 1996,
pagine: 229 - 235
SICI:
0378-8741(1996)51:1-3<229:ADOATI>2.0.ZU;2-2
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Keywords:
AUSTRALIA; BIODIVERSITY; ACCESS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
3
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
J.T. Baker et al., "AUSTRALIAN DELIBERATIONS ON ACCESS TO ITS TERRESTRIAL AND MARINE BIODIVERSITY", Journal of ethnopharmacology, 51(1-3), 1996, pp. 229-235

Abstract

The predominantly developed country business principle that the natural resource is effectively free, or of very low monetary value, has been significantly challenged in recent years, not only through the recognition of the accelerated rate of depletion of native forest resources and of the space and food demands of increasing populations, but also through international conventions which deal with a wide range of topics from the rights of indigenous people to the Law of the Sea Convention. Australia, classified as a developed country, but located in a geographic region of many developing countries, has, in the past 25 years, demonstrated particular concern for the rights of the people of those countries, as well as for the rights of indigenous people of Australia The practical international aspects were clearly exemplified in the time, from 1985, when the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) negotiated, within the National Cancer Institute (NCI) contract, that collections of biological samples in developing countries would be accompanied by an agreement to provide benefits arising from field work, and from any commercial product developments, to those countries. Australia, as a signatory to the Convention on Biological Diversity (Appendix I), continues to analyze the challenge presented by the need to freely exchange genetic resources of common value, e.g. food crops,while insuring an appropriate reward to developing and developed countries, should discoveries be made from their biological resources, which lead directly or indirectly, to high value commercial nonfood products. The Prime Minister's Coordinating Committee on Science and Technology established a special working group to recommend on access to Australia's biodiversity. The report arising from the study, and other related issues, are discussed.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 11/07/20 alle ore 16:33:32