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Titolo:
BLOOD-PRESSURE IN YOUNG BLACK AND WHITES - RELEVANCE OF OBESITY AND LIFE-STYLE FACTORS IN DETERMINING DIFFERENCES - THE CARDIA STUDY
Autore:
LIU K; RUTH KJ; FLACK JM; JONESWEBB R; BURKE G; SAVAGE PJ; HULLEY SB;
Indirizzi:
NORTHWESTERN UNIV,SCH MED,DEPT PREVENT MED,680 N LAKE SHORE DR,SUITE 1102 CHICAGO IL 60611 BOWMAN GRAY SCH MED,CTR HYPERTENS WINSTON SALEM NC 00000 UNIV MINNESOTA,SCH PUBL HLTH,DIV EPIDEMIOL MINNEAPOLIS MN 00000 BOWMAN GRAY SCH MED,DEPT PUBL HLTH SCI WINSTON SALEM NC 00000 NHLBI,DIV EPIDEMIOL & CLIN APPLICAT BETHESDA MD 20892 UNIV CALIF SAN FRANCISCO,DEPT EPIDEMIOL & BIOSTAT SAN FRANCISCO CA 94143
Titolo Testata:
Circulation
fascicolo: 1, volume: 93, anno: 1996,
pagine: 60 - 66
SICI:
0009-7322(1996)93:1<60:BIYBAW>2.0.ZU;2-4
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
LONGITUDINAL DATA-ANALYSIS; RISK-FACTORS; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION; ETHNIC-DIFFERENCES; SCHOOL-CHILDREN; SKIN COLOR; HYPERTENSION; HEART; AMERICANS; SMOKERS;
Keywords:
BLOOD PRESSURE; LIFE-STYLE; OBESITY; RACE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
38
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
K. Liu et al., "BLOOD-PRESSURE IN YOUNG BLACK AND WHITES - RELEVANCE OF OBESITY AND LIFE-STYLE FACTORS IN DETERMINING DIFFERENCES - THE CARDIA STUDY", Circulation, 93(1), 1996, pp. 60-66

Abstract

Background Middle-aged black men and women have higher blood pressure, on average, than whites. However, this pattern is inconsistent in children and adolescents. This study explores how differences in lifestyle factors in young adulthood may influence blood pressure patterns inthe two races. Methods and Results The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study is an ongoing collaborative investigation of lifestyle and the evolution of cardiovascular disease risk factors in a random sample of young adults ages 18 to 30 years at baseline (1985 to 1986). Data from four examinations over 7 years were analyzed with the use of a method that simultaneously examined cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships bf lifestyle factors and blood pressure. This study included 1154 black women, 853 black men, 1126 white women, and 1013 white men. Blacks had higher systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure than whites at every examination. Racial differences were much greater in women than in men and increased over time. Within each sex-race group, average diastolic blood pressure overfour examinations was positively associated with baseline age, body mass index, and alcohol intake and negatively associated with physical activity, cigarette use, and intake of potassium and protein. Longitudinal change in diastolic blood pressure was positively associated withchanges in body mass index and alcohol intake. After adjustment for obesity and other lifestyle factors, black-white diastolic blood pressure differences were reduced substantially: 21% to 75% for men and 49% to 129% for women. Results for systolic blood pressure were similar. Conclusions Differences in obesity and other lifestyle factors in youngadults largely explain the higher baseline blood pressure and greaterincrease over time of blacks relative to whites.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 05/12/20 alle ore 20:08:26