Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
THE DISTRIBUTIONS OF PARTHENOGENETIC ASCID MITES (ACARI, PARASITIFORMES) DO NOT SUPPORT THE BIOTIC UNCERTAINTY HYPOTHESIS
Autore:
WALTER DE; LINDQUIST EE;
Indirizzi:
UNIV QUEENSLAND,DEPT ENTOMOL ST LUCIA QLD 4072 AUSTRALIA
Titolo Testata:
Experimental & applied acarology
fascicolo: 8, volume: 19, anno: 1995,
pagine: 423 - 442
SICI:
0168-8162(1995)19:8<423:TDOPAM>2.0.ZU;2-T
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Keywords:
ASEXUAL; DISPERSAL; PARTHENOGENESIS; PREDATION; COMPETITION; BIOTIC UNCERTAINTY HYPOTHESIS; GENERAL PURPOSE GENOTYPE HYPOTHESIS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
NO
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
D.E. Walter e E.E. Lindquist, "THE DISTRIBUTIONS OF PARTHENOGENETIC ASCID MITES (ACARI, PARASITIFORMES) DO NOT SUPPORT THE BIOTIC UNCERTAINTY HYPOTHESIS", Experimental & applied acarology, 19(8), 1995, pp. 423-442

Abstract

Fifteen out of 50 species of ascid mites (30%) that we collected fromfour synanthropic and seven natural habitats in North America and Australia existed as all-female populations. In contrast to the predictions of the biotic uncertainty hypothesis (i.e, that parthenogenetic species are rare, restricted in distribution and survive through dispersal ability), we found that parthenogentic ascid mites were present in ten out of 11 habitats sampled, but were not superior colonists. In a glasshouse experiment, pasteurized soil in pots was colonized first by bisexual species and only later by all-female species. Furthermore, a habitat requiring strong dispersal abilities (decaying fungal sporocarps) lacked parthenogenetic species and a review of literature and collections indicated that all-female ascid species rarely form the phoretic associations with insects necessary to exploit patchy and ephemeralresources. The assumptions that parthenogens are reproductively superior to but competitively inferior to sexual relatives were not supported by experiments comparing a bisexual and an all-female species of Lasioseius.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 26/10/20 alle ore 08:05:57